luxolixoluxolixo

... echoes, ripples, buzz’d whispers, love-root, silk-thread, crotch and vine; my respiration and inspiration, the beating of my heart, the passing of blood and air through my lungs
(from Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass).


Ask me anything  
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Reblogged from poboh
poboh:

Le miroir, Henri Le Sidaner. French (1862 - 1939)

poboh:

Le miroir, Henri Le Sidaner. French (1862 - 1939)

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Reblogged from blastedheath
blastedheath:

Jannes de Vries (Dutch, 1901-1986), A North African landscape with palm trees. Oil on canvas, 70 x 90 cm.

blastedheath:

Jannes de Vries (Dutch, 1901-1986), A North African landscape with palm trees. Oil on canvas, 70 x 90 cm.

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Reblogged from urgetocreate
urgetocreate:

Georges Seurat, The Bridge at Courbevoie, 1886-87

urgetocreate:

Georges Seurat, The Bridge at Courbevoie, 1886-87

(via art--gallery)

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Reblogged from urgetocreate
urgetocreate:

Rose Naftulin. Reading Vuillard in the Garden, 1995

urgetocreate:

Rose Naftulin. Reading Vuillard in the Garden, 1995

(via art--gallery)

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Reblogged from lonequixote
lonequixote:

The Kiss ~ Edvard Munch
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Reblogged from enyaocean
enyaocean:

Gustav Klimt - The Music (1895) 

enyaocean:

Gustav Klimt - The Music (1895) 

(via largerloves)

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Reblogged from lawrenceleemagnuson
lawrenceleemagnuson:

Franz Marc (Germany 1880-1916)Deer at the Edge of the Forest (1908)opaque and transparent watercolor and crayon over graphite  107 x 293 mmBaltimore Museum of Art, USA

lawrenceleemagnuson:

Franz Marc (Germany 1880-1916)
Deer at the Edge of the Forest (1908)
opaque and transparent watercolor and crayon over graphite  107 x 293 mm
Baltimore Museum of Art, USA

(via alongtimealone)

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Reblogged from goodmemory
goodmemory:

 Untitled, August 1934.
Joan Miró

goodmemory:

 Untitled, August 1934.

Joan Miró

(via iffranco)

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Reblogged from artemisdreaming
artemisdreaming:

Face Inlay of the Pharaoh Akhenaten
Egypt, New Kingdom, Amarna Period, Dynasty XVIII, about 1353-1336 BCCast, then cold-worked to refine the sculptural quality of the portrait and to create cavities for additional inlays for the eye and eyebrowOverall H: 4.2 cm, Th: 0.6 cm, Gift of the Ennion SocietyCollection of The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY (^^2012.1.2^^)

artemisdreaming:

Face Inlay of the Pharaoh Akhenaten


Egypt, New Kingdom, Amarna Period, Dynasty XVIII, about 1353-1336 BC
Cast, then cold-worked to refine the sculptural quality of the portrait and to create cavities for additional inlays for the eye and eyebrow
Overall H: 4.2 cm, Th: 0.6 cm, Gift of the Ennion Society
Collection of The Corning Museum of Glass, Corning, NY (^^2012.1.2^^)

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Reblogged from artemisdreaming
artemisdreaming:

artemisdreaming:

1854 Woodcut Ancient Egyptian Remeses Harp Musician

Lay of the Harper
'Tis well with this good prince; his day is done, His happy fate fulfilled… . So one goes forth While others, as in days of old, remain. The old kings slumber in their pyramids, Likewise the noble and the learned, but some Who builded tombs have now no place of rest, Although their deeds were great… . Lo! I have heard The words Imhotep and Hordadaf spake— Their maxims men repeat… . Where are their tombs?— Long fallen … e’en their places are unknown, And they are now as though they ne’er had been.
No soul comes back to tell us how he fares— To soothe and comfort us ere we depart Whither he went betimes… . But let our minds Forget of this and dwell on better things… . Revel in pleasure while your life endures And deck your head with myrrh. Be richly clad In white and perfumed linen; like the gods Anointed be; and never weary grow In eager quest of what your heart desires— Do as it prompts you … until that sad day
Of lamentation comes, when hearts at rest Hear not the cry of mourners at the tomb, Which have no meaning to the silent dead. Then celebrate this festal time, nor pause— For no man takes his riches to the grave; Yea, none returns again when he goes hence.

From Egyptian Myth and Legend by Donald Mackenzie, 1907: “One of the most popular Egyptian poems is called “The Lay of the Harper”. It was chanted at the banquets given by wealthy men. “Ere the company rises,” wrote Herodotus, “a small coffin which contains a perfect model of the human body is carried round, and is shown to each guest in rotation. He who bears it exclaims: ‘Look at this figure… . After death you will be like it. Drink, therefore, and be merry.’” The “lay” in its earliest form was of great antiquity. Probably a real mummy was originally hauled through the banquet hall.” via: Sacred Texts

artemisdreaming:

artemisdreaming:

1854 Woodcut Ancient Egyptian Remeses Harp Musician

Lay of the Harper

'Tis well with this good prince; his day is done,
 His happy fate fulfilled… . So one goes forth
 While others, as in days of old, remain.
 The old kings slumber in their pyramids,
 Likewise the noble and the learned, but some
 Who builded tombs have now no place of rest,
 Although their deeds were great… .
 Lo! I have heard The words Imhotep and Hordadaf spake—
 Their maxims men repeat… . Where are their tombs?—
 Long fallen … e’en their places are unknown,
 And they are now as though they ne’er had been.

No soul comes back to tell us how he fares—
 To soothe and comfort us ere we depart
 Whither he went betimes… . But let our minds
 Forget of this and dwell on better things… .
 Revel in pleasure while your life endures
 And deck your head with myrrh. Be richly clad
 In white and perfumed linen; like the gods
 Anointed be; and never weary grow
 In eager quest of what your heart desires—
 Do as it prompts you … until that sad day

Of lamentation comes, when hearts at rest
 Hear not the cry of mourners at the tomb,
 Which have no meaning to the silent dead.
 Then celebrate this festal time, nor pause—
 For no man takes his riches to the grave;
 Yea, none returns again when he goes hence.

From Egyptian Myth and Legend by Donald Mackenzie, 1907: “One of the most popular Egyptian poems is called “The Lay of the Harper”. It was chanted at the banquets given by wealthy men. “Ere the company rises,” wrote Herodotus, “a small coffin which contains a perfect model of the human body is carried round, and is shown to each guest in rotation. He who bears it exclaims: ‘Look at this figure… . After death you will be like it. Drink, therefore, and be merry.’” The “lay” in its earliest form was of great antiquity. Probably a real mummy was originally hauled through the banquet hall.” via: Sacred Texts

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