luxolixoluxolixo

... echoes, ripples, buzz’d whispers, love-root, silk-thread, crotch and vine; my respiration and inspiration, the beating of my heart, the passing of blood and air through my lungs
(from Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass).


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Reblogged from oldpainting
oldpainting:

Giuseppe Palizzi (Italian, 1812-1888), Parrots in the Garden of Plants, 1879. Oil on canvas.
via

oldpainting:

Giuseppe Palizzi (Italian, 1812-1888), Parrots in the Garden of Plants, 1879. Oil on canvas.

via

(via blastedheath)

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Reblogged from dionyssos
amare-habeo:

Georges Rouault  (French, 1871-1958) - A Tabarin, 1905
via dionyssos

amare-habeo:

Georges Rouault  (French, 1871-1958) - A Tabarin, 1905

via dionyssos

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Reblogged from amare-habeo
amare-habeo:

Alexander Calder(American,1898 - 1976)
The Wild Beast Cage, 1932
Pen and ink on paper
Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, US

amare-habeo:

Alexander Calder(American,1898 - 1976)

The Wild Beast Cage, 1932

Pen and ink on paper

Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, US

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Reblogged from manpodcast

manpodcast:

Last year’s Getty Publications book "Chatting with Henri Matisse: The Lost 1941 Interview" has just won a bronze medal at this year’s Independent Publisher’s Book Awards! (The book was also listed as one of Modern Art Notes’ top books of 2013.)

"Chatting with Matisse" was featured on Episode No. 107 of The Modern Art Notes Podcast, when host Tyler Green and editor Serge Guilbaut discussed it in a live-audience program taped at Getty Center. 

Here’s the story behind the book: In 1941 art historian Pierre Courthion conducted an extensive interview with Matisse that was seen at the time as a vital assessment of his career. But just weeks before the book was to come out, Matisse suppressed its publication. Scholars have known about the interview for some time, but it’s never been published, or even widely available, until now. This beautiful new publication includes essays by Guilbaut, Yve-Alain Bois and Laurence Bertrand Dorleac. Chris Miller translated the interview.

Guilbaut is professor emeritus at The University of British Columbia. His previous projects include the book “How New York Stole the Idea of Modern Art: Abstract Expressionism, Freedom, and the Cold War.”

How to listen: Listen or download above, download the show direct to your PC/mobile device, or subscribe to The MAN Podcast at: 

(via impressionsonmymind)

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Reblogged from amare-habeo
amare-habeo:

Max Beckmann (German, 1884–1950),
Photography was taken by Hugo Erfurth in1928

amare-habeo:

Max Beckmann (German, 1884–1950),

Photography was taken by Hugo Erfurth in1928

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Max Oppenheimer Gustav Mahler conducting the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, (detail), 1935.

Max Oppenheimer 
Gustav Mahler conducting the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, (detail), 1935.

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Reblogged from terrathefair
terrathefair:

Max Oppenheimer- Quartett, etching, 1932

terrathefair:

Max Oppenheimer- Quartett, etching, 1932

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Reblogged from blastedheath
blastedheath:

Max Oppenheimer (Austrian, 1885-1954), The Violinist. Pencil, 22.5 x 16 cm.

blastedheath:

Max Oppenheimer (Austrian, 1885-1954), The Violinist. Pencil, 22.5 x 16 cm.

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Reblogged from floserber
floserber:

Paul klee, Figurine: Kleiner Fürtüfel (Figurine: Small fire devil), 1927,      tempera on paper laid on card, 33,3 x 25,1 cm. (13.1 x 9.9 in.)

floserber:

Paul klee, Figurine: Kleiner Fürtüfel (Figurine: Small fire devil), 1927,      tempera on paper laid on card, 33,3 x 25,1 cm. (13.1 x 9.9 in.)

(via giampixxx)

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Reblogged from arcadiaart
arcadiaart:

Fabio Fabbi (Italian, 1861-1946), “Odalisca”.

arcadiaart:

Fabio Fabbi (Italian, 1861-1946), “Odalisca”.

(via mycolorbook)

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